Tag Archive | Writers

Communicating your thoughts and ideas onto the page

Soul of Planet earth is in each of usWriting is simply a voice retelling a story to the audience in a way that is compelling, honest, and they can connect themselves to. Readers should feel engrossed in the lives of your characters, curious to see the outcome, and willing to take the journeys down many pathways with the characters. If writing does anything at all, it should move the reader to think deeply by giving them new insights and ideas into aspects of life that they already are going through, possibly could go through, or they will hopefully never go through.

All writing effects readers and should allow them to feel something. Writing should make readers feel, whether those feelings are happy, sad, angry, or what have you. Good writing should convey those moments in time with a clear view of all the circumstances and events and obstacles the characters go through on their many paths. Readers should see how the characters develop, change, and take solid shape from the beginning to the end, and at the conclusion, they should understand and feel that the characters were real, honest, and their choices were what they really would have done.

Characters are meant to be relateable, loved and hated, by the readers. They are essentially symbols for the many facets of humanity and inhumanity that we as people harbor in some respect within ourselves; the many shades of humanity wrapped up in creativity, imagination, and possibility. Readers should see this in the characters. However, it is not always easy to convey those ideals into your writing. Some times it’s hard to figure out where to start, how to move it along, and when to end their stories.

In my time being a writer and reader, I have found a method that works best for me, and that method is what I call the Movie Transition Method. The Movie Transition Method is when I take the basic essential format of how a script or movie film is made and transition it into a time frame of events that really elaborate and relay the story of my characters in a way that keeps readers reading and myself writing.

How I plan out what I need to put into my characters story is as follows:

1. I make a time line. I draw one long horizontal line three-forths of the way across a blank, clear paper. Then I draw three vertical lines on the page, so I have three sections, which I label as: The Setup, the Conflict, and the resolution.

2. I add in events and important information that I feel need to be included in the story.

The Setup includes:

-Introducing the characters and their situations

-Bringing the readers into the characters’ worlds

-Setting up the foreshadowing of events to come later

The Conflict includes:

-Getting deeper into the characters’ thoughts, life, and their struggles

-How the characters react to the events occurring

-How and why things are happening  to these characters

-The conflict that the characters go through and what their lowest points are

-The build of suspense and mystery

The Resolution includes:

-The lowest, darkest, or troubling times for the characters

-How the characters react to the situations and how their behavior ultimately leaves them to the end, or next chapter, in their lives-The climax, or the defining moment(s), that resolve the conflict and shape the characters into the change or same individuals they are

-The summary, wrap up of events, ending note, or cliffhanger that leads into the next chapters in the characters’ lives.

3. The Movie Transition Method of outlining leads into the outlining phase.

This phase is especially important because I take the meat, or content, of the Movie Transition Method timeline and write out the content that will be included into the story in an outline. This later leads me to write the first draft of my characters’ stories and life.

It’s important that I make a note here to tell you that an easier way to think of writing your characters’, or even your, stories is by pretending it’s a movie film. You have your beginning, middle, and end. The beginning should be informative, the middle should be interesting and enticing, and the end should be moving, critical, and it should end after the important chapter does. Do not prolong a character’s story for better length. Content is what is key in your writing.

Think of your writing as a movie. Write out the important scenes: delete scenes that have no real connection or importance to your characters’ motives or actions, extend scenes that have power over the characters’ journeys, and highlight the reasons why your characters’ stories are important for your readers to read and accompany your characters on. All of that is how you can communicate your thoughts and ideas, which essentially are your characters’ thoughts and ideas, onto the page and visible for your readers to see, feel, and understand.

 

Writers and Readers Live Many Lives

Writers and Readers Live Many Lives

Writers do write to taste life twice. In many ways, readers and writers alike both read and write books to jump into the story, see it through the eyes of the main character, and experience his/her adventure with them as if we are really there and his/her world is as tangible as our own realities.

When readers read books that have compelling story lines, real world situations, and characters with emotions that the readers can identify with. All books are written with this purpose in mind, that the stories readers choose to pick up are really fantasy worlds and have alternative lives that the readers themselves entertain to be their own worlds as they read.

Writers read books such as those too. Writers read them because they know that these are the books their readers want to read. These are the books that are going to show them, with the power of critical thinking and analyzing, how they need to write characters, plots, story lines, emotional build up, realism, themes, and how to relate to their readers. Everything is a learning lesson, especially in life and in books. The whole purpose of writing books is to share and teach readers life lessons. We aim to enrich their minds with the knowledge, ideas, and insights that we have within our own minds, because when we write our characters and our characters worlds and realities, we write with the readers in mind.  The abilities that we have as writers is that we can pull all of this information about our characters, where they come from, where they are now, and their journeys to get to where they have to go, and mentally, visually take it out of our minds and imprint it into our readers minds, so that way they, themselves, can see, hear, touch, taste, and smell everything happening in the book as we do, with a sense of realism and honesty etched into every word on the page.

So, yes, writers do write to taste life twice, and often times way more than just twice. Readers do this as well. They read to put themselves into others’ shoes, situations, and minds. We all grow as individuals, readers, and writers by what we read. We grow along with the stories and the characters. They are friends that are eternally emblazoned into our minds; memories of lifetimes we have lived.

The Art of Characters

The Art of Characters

F. Scott Fitzgerald got it right when he spoke these words. Writers are many people in one body. To develop, create, craft, mold, and imagine characters up from bits and pieces of our daily encounters with people, shreds of ourselves, things we see everyday, and build them from the ground up in our imagination as people. People of whom become as real to us as flesh and blood. Friends, enemies, children, etc. We all have deep roots with our characters. In a way, it’s like childbirth; we go through the mental “pain” of giving them life, so that they can entertain our reads with their journeys and life stories. We become attached to them and we know them better than anyone else in this world. They essentially become a part of his, a part of our own personal history. We see through their eyes the world, their thoughts, their joy, their pain, their fear, everything. The real challenge is finding ways to make these characters relateable and telling their stories well enough to paint vivid pictures in our readers’ minds. That is the challenge every writer, beginner or master, has to become the victor at.